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Phone: (208) 745-0400

143 1/2 East Main Street
Rigby, ID 83442-1417

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Welcome to our online office. We are located in the heart of Rigby, Idaho. We have been specializing in general dentistry since 2001. We believe that our family of patients deserve the best in dental care. We welcome and invite you to stop by our office any time.

- Dr. Robert L. Ellis

Our Practice Values

At My West Wind Dental, we are determined to provide the highest quality dental care for our community. We are committed to continuing dental education for our doctors and staff, to the continual improvement of our clinical skills and to the emphasis of prevention over treatment.

Health

We recognize that dental health and overall health are directly related, and we strive to help all of our patients achieve total health.

State of the Art

We also accept the challenge to keep our facility, our dental materials, our technique and our laboratory support at state of the art levels.

Comfort

You can rely on My WestWInd Dental to treat you and your family with courtesy, respect and a passion to do our very best for you.

Community

At My West Wind Dental, we are determined to provide the highest quality dental care for our community.

Our Team

Meet our team and find out why we're passionate about what we do.

Make an appointment with us today!

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Our Services

At My West Wind Dental we offer a wide variety of services. Click on any service to learn more or call us at (208) 745-0400.

Root Canal

What is root canal treatment?

Root canal treatment is the removal of the nerve and blood vessels of a tooth for the purpose of trying to save the tooth from extraction. A simple analogy is removing the wick from a candle. The void where the wick was is cleaned and smoothed and then we place a rubber type material into the cleaned out space to seal the canal.

What is the dental pulp?

The pulp is the soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. It lies within the tooth and extends from within the crown of the tooth (that portion of the tooth that is visible) to the tip of the root in the bone of the jaws.

What happens if the pulp gets injured?

When the pulp is diseased or injured and can’t repair itself, it dies. The most common cause of pulp death is a cracked tooth or a deep cavity. Both of these problems can let germs (bacteria) enter the pulp. Germs can cause an infection inside the tooth. Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip, in the jawbone, forming a “pus-pocket” called an abscess. An abscess can cause damage to the bone around the teeth.

Why does the pulp need to be removed?

When the infected pulp, which is made up of blood vessels and nerves, is not removed, pain and/or swelling can result. Some elements of the infection can injure your jaw bones and the resulting bacteria may enter your bloodstream. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed. In severe cases, you might need to be hospitalized due to an infection throughout your body.

What does treatment involve?

Treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, the diseased pulp gets removed. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and they are filled with a rubber type material that seals the tooth so that no germs enter the tooth.

Here’s how your tooth is saved through treatment:

First, an opening is made through the top of the tooth into the pulp chamber. The pulp is then removed. The root canal(s) is cleaned and smoothed. Medications may be put in the root canal(s) to help get rid of germs and prevent infection. If the treatment requires more than one visit, a temporary filling will be placed in the crown opening to protect the tooth between appointments or we may leave the tooth open for a few days to drain. If a prescription is provided, please follow the directions. On the subsequent appointment, the temporary filling is removed and the pulp chamber and root canal(s) are cleaned and filled and the root canal treatment is completed. However, if we advise you that your tooth requires a crown, you need to return to our office for that procedure.

Implants

A dental implant is essentially an artificial tooth root that is surgically placed into the jawbone. One or more missing teeth can be replaced by attaching a crown, a fixed bridge, or a full set of dentures on top of the implants. The implant material, which is typically pure titanium, is extremely biocompatible since the bone treats the implant just as if it were bone. The effect is that the bone cells attach themselves to the implant and the interface between the bone and the implants is termed osseointegration. After an initial healing period, during which the implant(s) is left undisturbed underneath the gum tissue, it is uncovered and connected to a small post that serves as the foundation for the tooth or teeth that the implant will be supporting.

Preventative

  • Dental Cleanings
  • Digital Radiography
  • Oral Cancer Screenings
  • Fluoride Treatments
  • Sealants for the Prevention of Decay
  • Diagnosis and treatment of Halitosis (bad breath)

Cosmetic Dentistry

Lumineers a terrific cosmetic solution for permanently stained, chipped, discolored, misaligned teeth, or even to revitalize old crown and bridgework.

Lumineers are a porcelain veneer that can be made as thin as a contact lens and is placed over existing teeth without requiring painful removal of sensitive tooth structure (unlike traditional veneers.)

Lumineers can only be made from patented Cerinate porcelain. This revolutionary porcelain is crafted through a proprietary process unavailable anywhere other than the Cerinate Smile Design Studios owned by Den-Mat Corporation.

In just two or three visits to the dentist, Lumineers provides a custom-made smile clinically proven to last over 20 years.

The natural color of teeth is not white. They are typically a shade of either yellow or gray and tooth color varies from person to person.The procedure to whiten teeth is fairly simple but there are some rules that need to be followed to achieve and maintain good results.

There are many reasons why teeth can become discolored. The major reasons are:

There are a few different ways that we can whiten your teeth in the office. We can whiten them from the outside in or the inside out. The inside out method, which is known as internal bleaching, is only an option for teeth that have previously had root canal treatment.

This means that the color of the teeth is lightened by placing a whitening solution on the outside of the teeth. This is also known as “laser” or “power” bleaching. We will put a rubber seal around your teeth to protect your gums. Then, the bleaching gel is painted onto your teeth and a special, bright light is pointed at them. This light speeds up the whitening process. The procedure takes one to two hours.

Some patients report a temporary increase in sensitivity. Tender gums are also a known side effect especially if you are whitening at home and use too much of the whitening solution. Remember that if a little is good that a lot will not make your teeth any whiter.

NO! There is no whitening solution for most dental work such as fillings, crowns, veneers, and partial or full dentures. If the color of your teeth matches the color of your dental work before whitening, the color of your teeth will most likely be a different color after whitening than the color of the dental work after whitening. You are making a commitment to replacing those restorations if you whiten your teeth. We typically wait a few weeks after any whitening treatment to replace these restorations since we want to match the new color and we want the color to stabilize before choosing a color for the new restorations.

Your gums must also be healthy and any decay must be treated since both of these can be a cause of sensitivity during whitening treatments.

Teeth whitening is not recommended for children whose teeth are still developing or for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Restorative

Fillings

After diagnosing the problem and devising a treatment plan, the next step to restore a tooth to health is to make you comfortable. We give you a local anesthetic so you do not feel any discomfort. After the decay is removed, the tooth is designed to receive either a direct restoration or an indirect restoration.
A direct restoration means the tooth can likely be restored in one visit and that there is sufficient tooth structure for the filling to go inside the tooth or at least sufficient tooth structure to maintain the majority of the natural tooth. Examples of direct restorations are amalgam, which is silver colored and composite, which is tooth colored. There have been more amalgam fillings placed worldwide than any other fillings but the tooth-colored fillings are being placed more than amalgam fillings these days because of their superior esthetic qualities.
An indirect filling means the restoration is made outside of your mouth, either by a lab or by a milling machine. An indirect filling also needs to be cemented into place. Examples of indirect restorations are crowns, inlays and onlays. A crown covers the entire tooth, an inlay fits inside the tooth and can replace a wall of the tooth, and an onlay replaces at least one cusp of the tooth.

Most indirect restorations take two or more appointments to complete, with the exception of restorations that are milled by a machine in the office. Cast gold is the most durable indirect restoration material but porcelain ceramics are gaining in popularity because of their superior esthetic qualities.

After diagnosing the problem and devising a treatment plan, the next step to restore a tooth to health is to make you comfortable. We give you a local anesthetic so you do not feel any discomfort. After the decay is removed, the tooth is designed to receive either a direct restoration or an indirect restoration.
A direct restoration means the tooth can likely be restored in one visit and that there is sufficient tooth structure for the filling to go inside the tooth or at least sufficient tooth structure to maintain the majority of the natural tooth. Examples of direct restorations are amalgam, which is silver colored and composite, which is tooth colored. There have been more amalgam fillings placed worldwide than any other fillings but the tooth-colored fillings are being placed more than amalgam fillings these days because of their superior esthetic qualities.
An indirect filling means the restoration is made outside of your mouth, either by a lab or by a milling machine. An indirect filling also needs to be cemented into place. Examples of indirect restorations are crowns, inlays and onlays. A crown covers the entire tooth, an inlay fits inside the tooth and can replace a wall of the tooth, and an onlay replaces at least one cusp of the tooth.

Most indirect restorations take two or more appointments to complete. Cast gold is the most durable indirect restoration material but porcelain ceramics are gaining in popularity because of their superior esthetic qualities.

Crowns

When the structure of the entire tooth is compromised, a crown, which covers all the surfaces of the tooth, will need to be placed.

The first step is to prepare the tooth for a crown, which requires us to reduce the tooth so the lab has enough room to produce a life-like crown. We then take an impression, select the proper color for the crown and make a temporary, at which time the first appointment is completed.

Your case is then sent to the lab to make the crown, which is then tried in and adjusted. Our job is to communicate what your wishes and desires are to the lab technicians so your new crown will be in harmony with the surrounding teeth.

Before your new crown is cemented, we check the fit, the contacts, the bite and the color to make sure it has the same characteristics of your natural teeth.
You then go home with a beautiful natural looking healthy tooth.

Bridges

When a tooth has been lost and there are healthy teeth on both sides of the newly missing tooth or teeth, then a fixed bridge is a treatment option. The other options are implants or a partial denture.

The procedure for having a fixed bridge made is essentially the same as having a crown made except that a fixed bridge involves at least two supporting teeth. What does cause confusion is the amount of teeth needed for a fixed bridge. To replace one missing tooth requires a three tooth bridge. This is because the teeth on both sides of the missing tooth must be part of the bridge to provide support.
Fixed bridges are typically made from porcelain with a metal sub-structure and they require at least two appointments. The first appointment is used to prepare and temporize the teeth. The second appointment is the delivery appointment to adjust and cement the fixed bridge in place. Occasionally a third appointment is needed if the span of the bridge is long and the supporting framework for the bridge needs to be tried in before the porcelain is applied to the framework.

Even though all of the teeth of the bridge are physically connected, the final result makes it look like the teeth are individual and natural.

Contact Us

Call us, email us or stop by the office. We’re always here for you!

Visit our Office

West Wind Dental
143 East Main Street
Rigby, ID 83442-1417

Contact Us

marci@mywinddental.com
P: (208) 745-0400

Office Hours

Mon - Thur: 8am to 5pm
Friday: By appointment

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